HP TECH TAKES /...

Exploring today's technology for tomorrow's possibilities
Meet the HP Reverb VR Headset

Meet the HP Reverb VR Headset

Michelle Wilson
|
Whether you’re ready or not, virtual reality (VR) is transforming multiple industries through its unique ability to transport a user to a completely immersive world. But before VR began taking over, it had humble beginnings that preempted even the invention of computers. The HP Reverb VR headset represents centuries of conceptual thinking, engineering, creativity, and sci-fi concepts come to life.
It’s a breakthrough VR headset in both design and features ready to completely alter day-to-day life. Before we dive into what makes the HP Reverb so special and unique, we’ll look into VR’s origins so you can appreciate how this new HP VR product is the pinnacle of performance in the virtual reality landscape.

A brief history of virtual reality

The earliest attempts at creating a reality where the viewer feels like he or she is present at the scene can be traced all the way back to the 17th and 18th centuries. Muralists and painters attempted to create visuals that gave the audience a deep perspective with careful attention to verisimilitude.
This trend continued into the Realist movement of the 18th century when creatives of the era painted large paintings that were meant to fill a viewer’s entire field of view.
In 1838, British physicist Charles Wheatstone’s research proved that the brain processed the two-dimensional images from each eye into an object of three-dimensions. He invented the stereoscope where two side-by-side stereoscopic images or photos in a stereoscope delivered an experience of a three-dimensional reality to viewers. Later on, the View-Master stereoscope was patented by William Gruber and used for virtual tourism.
In the mid-1950s, the cinematographer Morton Heilig created the Sensorama, an arcade-style theater cabinet that stimulated the senses with stereo speakers, a 3D display, fans, smell generators, and a vibrating chair.
These unique devices weren’t quite the virtual reality devices we have today. However, with the introduction of the Computer Age, virtual reality inventions sped up with increasing sophistication powering them behind the scenes. Morton Heilig invented the Telesphere Mask in 1960 followed by Ivan Sutherland's “Ultimate Display” in 1965 which created a simulated 3D-world that users could interact with thanks to computer hardware.
In 1987, the name for a simulated, artificial reality was officially named “Virtual Reality.” Research and money were poured into VR technology and resulted in a variety of different devices.1991 saw the introduction of virtual reality group arcade machines and Sega pioneered VR glasses in 1993 - but it never actually hit the market beyond the prototype model due to technical manufacturing issues.
Surprisingly, what helped propel virtual reality forward might have been the movie, The Matrix, which put the concept of simulated reality into the forefront of the public consciousness in 1999. The 2000s have been full of developments in the world of virtual reality, including the division of different kinds of virtual reality:
  1. Augmented reality (AR): AR provides users with an experience of the real world enhanced with virtual objects. Real-world examples of AR include apps such as Google Sky Map and Pokémon Go.
  2. Mixed reality (MR): MR allows users to interact with both the real world and a virtual environment. For example, mixed reality is used for vehicle design so engineers and designers can visualize how changes appear on a preliminary clay model of a car before officially making the change.
  3. Virtual reality (VR): Virtual reality delivers an entirely immersive virtual, digital world.

Uses for virtual reality

You’re probably already familiar with one major use of virtual reality: gaming. However, there are tons of other reasons why virtual reality is changing the market.

Entertainment

Hate crowds but love concerts? VR companies are creating the ultimate workaround: a complete concert experience minus the elbow-bumping and crowd-jostling. Audiences can enjoy a concert as if they were there. NextVR provides users with the ability to experience live events through a variety of VR headsets after downloading their free app.
Or, if you want to attend a sports game in another country, LiveLike VR has created a virtual stadium to make you feel like you’re actually courtside or right alongside the pitch with your favorite elite athletes.
If you’re a cinephile, apps such as Oculus Video give you the ultimate cinematic experience but from the comfort of your own home. It also allows you to “watch” movies virtually with your friends.

Tourism

If you can’t afford to take an international trip, you can do so through the technological magic of VR. Marriott’s VR Postcards, for example, is an app that takes users on a virtual journey to another state or country. Marriott describes it as a fully immersive travel experience that allows users to explore a unique destination in 360 degrees. Destinations that users can virtually travel to include the Andes Mountains in Chile, an ice cream shop in Rwanda, and the streets of Beijing.

Health care

Virtual reality can be used to make 3D models of a patient's anatomy which in turn helps surgeons figure out the best way to locate tumors or where to make surgical incisions. VR also gives surgeons the chance to practice difficult or complex surgical procedures ahead of time.
VR can also be used as an additional diagnostic tool in conjunction with other imaging tools like CT scans and MRIs. This may help eliminate the need for invasive exploratory surgeries to figure out a patient’s main health issue.
For patients who are recovering from injuries, disease, or surgery, virtual reality can aid in the healing process. Immersive reality therapy by MindMaze, for instance, helps patients regain their mobility and brain function faster through virtual exercises and real-time feedback.

Space explorations

Virtual reality may enable NASA scientists to control robots and other devices that are millions of miles away. VR also provides NASA with a way to train astronauts remotely for tasks like fixing parts around the space station.

Museums

Museums have recently been leveraging virtual reality technology to provide visitors with a personal view of different historical events, priceless art, and past historical figures as an immersive storytelling device. Museums that have tested out AR and VR technology experienced higher attendance.

Meet the HP Reverb headset

Now that you have a better understanding of the state of virtual reality, you’re ready to learn more about one of the newest devices in the VR market, the HP Reverb headset. This unique high-resolution VR headset is changing the game for businesses and other professional industries.
Whether you work as a digital artist at a design firm, as a surgeon in a hospital, or as a sales director at a large company, the HP Reverb can help take your everyday workday to the next level. Your 9 to 5 is about to get a lot more futuristic.
If you’re ready to discover an entirely new world of virtual reality outside of gaming, you’re ready for the HP Reverb. When you put on the HP Reverb headset, you’ll enjoy an incredible 2160 x 2160 pixel resolution and a 114-degree field of view. In addition, integrated spatial audio and dual smart assistant supported mics support all of your collaborative needs and expand the potential of this incredibly capable virtual reality technology.
This headset is lighter, smaller, and sleeker than other VR headsets on the market which means it’s easier to wear. Manufactured from incredibly light MDF, the HP Reverb offers long-lasting comfort for a completely natural viewing experience where you won’t be distracted by ill-fitting parts.
Plus, the HP Reverb boasts Windows MR and SteamVR compatibility. With integrated Bluetooth, you’ll never have to worry about manual syncing or lackluster controller tracking. Take advantage of this futuristic technology without any of the unnecessary hassles.

Uses for the HP Reverb

  1. Training: The HP Reverb is perfect for high-risk safety simulations as well as for training soft skills like public speaking. VR enables seven times more retention than traditional learning. This means that your employees will remember and retain important information for work-related tasks so you can spend less time on training and more time growing your business.
  2. Design: From exploring design concepts to allowing users to explore a product in a simulated showroom, you can create and manage all of your design workflows.
  3. Healthcare: Help patients understand their medical procedures with the help of VR. Instead of looking at flat 2D scans and X-rays, your patients will have the opportunity to comprehend their own anatomy and surgery in a fully immersive experience.

The best features of the HP Reverb

Here are some of the highlights of the HP Reverb:
  • Adjustable and removable headphones with built-in spatial audio
  • Dual mics with smart assistance for efficient communication during collaborations with clients, colleagues or prospects
  • Integrated Bluetooth for seamless syncing and precise controller tracking
  • Soft, adjustable straps for a perfectly customized and comfortable fit
  • Leather faceplate that’s both removable and wipeable
  • Vents for proper air circulation to keep you cool and comfortable

HP Reverb specs

  • Resolution: 2160 x 2160 pixel panel resolution
  • Degrees of movement: Move up, down, back, forth, and side-to-side in your VR experience
  • Motion controller: Two Bluetooth-connected motion controllers that deliver accurate tracking of hand and arm movements
  • Field of view: 114-degree field of view with a Windows Mixed Reality Ultra compatible PC
  • Refresh rate: 90 Hz refresh rate
  • Integrated motion tracking: No need for extra peripherals, get right to your VR experience
  • Quick-release cable: Attach and detach cables running from your PC to the headset quickly and easily
  • Face cushion: Your headset is incredibly easy to clean so you can use it repeatedly
  • Cables: 2-in-1 cables are included
    • The 3.5 m cable is perfect to connect your VR headset with a desktop or mobile workstation
    • The 0.6 m cable is best for connecting to the HP Z VR backpack wearing VR PC
  • Platforms: Full support in both the Windows Mixed Reality or SteamVR
  • Dimension: 2.17 x 6.97 x 3.31 inches
  • Weight: 1.1 lbs without cable

Included in the box:

  • HP Reverb Virtual Reality Headset - Professional Edition
  • 3.5 m headset cable for desktop and mobile PCs
  • 0.6 m headset cable for HP Z VR Backpack wearable VR PC (HP Z VR backpack PC sold separately)
  • 2 motion controllers
  • 1 DisplayPort to mini-DisplayPort™ adapter
  • Setup document
  • 1 year limited warranty

The future of virtual reality

Virtual reality technology is here to stay. Whether you’re looking to add a VR headset to your gaming rig for the ultimate immersive game experience or you’re trying to make a museum exhibit more attractive to younger, technology-hungry audiences, the HP Reverb headset could be the answer. With its unique features, the HP Reverb stands apart from other VR headsets.
Comfortable and adaptable, the HP Reverb is ready to dazzle regardless of the industry you’re in. For businesses, you can use the HP Reverb to show potential clients what a redesign of their current house would look like before starting a renovation.
For artists, you can virtually map out a large-scale mural to work out potential designs or roadblocks. And for healthcare, you can help patients better understand their surgery or other medical procedures with an immersive imaging experience.
The HP Reverb is the perfect complement to any professional office looking to expand their potential to help clients and attract new ones.

About the Author

Michelle Wilson is a contributing writer for HP® Tech Takes. Michelle is a content creation specialist writing for a variety of industries, including tech trends and media news.

Disclosure: Our site may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.

More about these products
Disclaimer

Prices, specifications, availability and terms of offers may change without notice. Price protection, price matching or price guarantees do not apply to Intra-day, Daily Deals or limited-time promotions. Quantity limits may apply to orders, including orders for discounted and promotional items. Despite our best efforts, a small number of items may contain pricing, typography, or photography errors. Correct prices and promotions are validated at the time your order is placed. These terms apply only to products sold by HP.com; reseller offers may vary. Items sold by HP.com are not for immediate resale. Orders that do not comply with HP.com terms, conditions, and limitations may be cancelled. Contract and volume customers not eligible.

HP’s MSRP is subject to discount. HP’s MSRP price is shown as either a stand-alone price or as a strike-through price with a discounted or promotional price also listed. Discounted or promotional pricing is indicated by the presence of an additional higher MSRP strike-through price

The following applies to HP systems with Intel 6th Gen and other future-generation processors on systems shipping with Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 Pro systems downgraded to Windows 7 Professional, Windows 8 Pro, or Windows 8.1: This version of Windows running with the processor or chipsets used in this system has limited support from Microsoft. For more information about Microsoft’s support, please see Microsoft’s Support Lifecycle FAQ at https://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle

Ultrabook, Celeron, Celeron Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon, Xeon Phi, Xeon Inside, and Intel Optane are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.

In-home warranty is available only on select customizable HP desktop PCs. Need for in-home service is determined by HP support representative. Customer may be required to run system self-test programs or correct reported faults by following advice given over phone. On-site services provided only if issue can't be corrected remotely. Service not available holidays and weekends.

HP will transfer your name and address information, IP address, products ordered and associated costs and other personal information related to processing your application to Bill Me Later®. Bill Me Later will use that data under its privacy policy.

Microsoft Windows 10: Not all features are available in all editions or versions of Windows 10. Systems may require upgraded and/or separately purchased hardware, drivers, software or BIOS update to take full advantage of Windows 10 functionality. Windows 10 is automatically updated, which is always enabled. ISP fees may apply and additional requirements may apply over time for updates. See http://www.microsoft.com.

HP Rewards qualifying and eligible products/purchases are defined as those from the following categories: Printers, Business PCs (Elite, Pro and Workstation brands), select Business Accessories and select Ink, Toner & Paper.