HP TECH TAKES /...

Exploring today's technology for tomorrow's possibilities
Why is My Laptop Battery Not Charging?

Why is My Laptop Battery Not Charging?

A dead laptop battery can keep you from getting your work done, but what happens if you can’t get it to charge properly? There are many reasons why a battery may fail to charge, including a faulty battery, inadequate power source, or damaged cord. Some of the reasons can be fixed quickly as long you know what to do. In this article, we’ll look at why your laptop battery won’t charge and provide the steps you can take to get it working again.

Two related issues to check first

1. Rule out charging cord issues

You need to first make sure that the problem is actually your battery. There are a number of components that work together to power your laptop, so you need to rule everything else out. Start by plugging in your computer to see if the LED light shows power going to the laptop. If it lights up, your device is receiving power, which means your problem isn’t the cord or power source.
If the light doesn't come on, check your cord. Many come in two pieces, so ensure that they are connected tightly. Also, try plugging it into a tested outlet that you know works. You'll want to make sure the place where the power comes into your laptop, also called the "jack," is secure and doesn't wiggle.
One common problem for laptops is that they get bumped where the cord connects, which can cause the charging port to become loose or damaged. As a result, your laptop will fail to receive power and won’t charge the battery.

2. Review your software options

Next, see that your computer has proper settings. On Windows 10, you’ll do the following:
  • Click on Start, then look for the Power and Sleep Settings (this is called Power Options in older versions of Windows)
  • Click Change Plan Settings and review your battery and power savings settings for anything odd
Be on the lookout for potentially troubling battery settings. These can include settings that cause the computer to shut down at a low level, or that trigger sleep mode when you shut the lid or are inactive for a few minutes. Anything that would make your computer turn off, and therefore mimic a battery failure, should be adjusted.
Your battery driver may also be experiencing issues. Again, on Windows 10, follow these steps:
  • From the Start menu, look for Device Manager
  • Select Batteries and identify the driver for your battery
  • Right-click the driver and choose Update Driver
  • If the driver needs a newer version, it will update, and you can restart your computer
  • If you previously didn't get the charging symbol over the battery icon on your desktop toolbar, but it's showing now, this could have been the problem

How healthy is your battery?

If your battery still isn’t charging, chances are you have a faulty battery. One of the most common reasons a battery may not charge is its health. Old or damaged batteries may only charge partially, lose their power quickly, or go from fully charged to dead in minutes.
If you notice that your battery isn't performing as it once used to and you ruled out all other issues, your battery’s health is probably compromised.
Signs of a worn-out battery include:
  • Getting too hot when charging, especially along the bottom of the case where the battery is located
  • Losing charge quickly
  • Taking too long to charge
One way to inspect the battery is by simply looking at it. Remove the battery from your laptop, but be careful if you’ve just used your laptop because it may be hot. Does the battery appear cracked or swollen? If you see any leaking, a gummy residue, or broken plastic along the surface area, stop using it right away and order a replacement.
Another option is the battery health check, which can tell you more about the condition of a battery that appears to be in good working order but fails to hold a charge. To test your laptop battery, you’ll need to run a battery report. This is easy to do with Windows 10.

How to run a battery report in Windows 10

If your laptop battery won’t charge because it’s outlived its useful life, this report can tell you. To generate one:
  • Press the Windows key + X key at the same time
  • Select Windows Powershell (Admin) when it pops up
  • Click yes when prompted to give permission to make changes to your device
  • You will see a small black pop-up window, type powercfg/batteryreport/output “C\battery-report.html” on the first available line and click the Enter key
  • Some text will display and then you’ll see a path to where your you can find the report
  • Close the window
  • Check for the report’s location by using File Explorer. It might be on the Desktop or in your Documents folder
  • The report is a browser file, such as Chrome or Internet Explorer. Click the file to open in a browser window
Now that you have found the report, here is what you should look for:

Battery capacity

The battery’s intended charging capacity will appear in the right-hand column, but the battery’s actual capacity will be in the left-hand column. As you look down the list, you should see the actual capacity getting slightly lower over time. If there’s a significant difference between the actual capacity and the design capacity in the most recent records, you know that your battery has degraded. Note any sudden drop in capacity, as well.

Battery life estimation

Another important clue for a laptop battery not charging is the battery life. The right column shows how long the battery should last at the current charge for the time it was recorded. The column on the left shows the actual battery life. If the difference is significant, your battery is not lasting as long as it should.
Final battery life estimation will also show at the bottom. If it’s much less than the life you had when you first purchased the computer, that’s a sign of poor battery health.

When it’s time to get a new battery

There's not much you can do to bring a dying battery back to life, although you may have some time left if it’s still functioning and can hold a charge for a few hours. But if you want to avoid losing power when you’re in the middle of an important task, you should be proactive and replace a bad battery before you have an unexpected failure.
If you decide to switch out your battery for a new one, be wary about where you get your replacement battery. While there are many vendors online that sell batteries marketed as compatible with your laptop, it's smart to buy only from approved resellers for your brand of computer. If you own an HP laptop, you can make sure you’re getting the right battery by reviewing our battery finder tool.
A third-party product can have many issues. In addition to being low quality, this type of battery could also void your warranty. Leaky or malfunctioning batteries can ruin your laptop and cause problems far beyond a simple charging issue. For the best battery, visit your manufacturer's website for an authorized replacement.

Batteries not charging is a minor problem

With everything that could go wrong with a laptop, the battery is a rather simple fix. Replacing the battery or even the charging cord is much more affordable than replacing your entire laptop.
Even if you have a broken charging jack, many computer repair shops can easily solder in an approved replacement. Plus, if you've thought ahead and purchased the HP Care Pack, these fixes may be covered by your plan.
About the Author: Linsey Knerl is a contributing writer for HP® Tech Takes. Linsey is a Midwest-based author, public speaker, and member of the ASJA. She has a passion for helping consumers and small business owners do more with their resources via the latest tech solutions.

Disclosure: Our site may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.

More about these products
Disclaimer

Prices, specifications, availability and terms of offers may change without notice. Price protection, price matching or price guarantees do not apply to Intra-day, Daily Deals or limited-time promotions. Quantity limits may apply to orders, including orders for discounted and promotional items. Despite our best efforts, a small number of items may contain pricing, typography, or photography errors. Correct prices and promotions are validated at the time your order is placed. These terms apply only to products sold by HP.com; reseller offers may vary. Items sold by HP.com are not for immediate resale. Orders that do not comply with HP.com terms, conditions, and limitations may be cancelled. Contract and volume customers not eligible.

HP’s MSRP is subject to discount. HP’s MSRP price is shown as either a stand-alone price or as a strike-through price with a discounted or promotional price also listed. Discounted or promotional pricing is indicated by the presence of an additional higher MSRP strike-through price

The following applies to HP systems with Intel 6th Gen and other future-generation processors on systems shipping with Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 Pro systems downgraded to Windows 7 Professional, Windows 8 Pro, or Windows 8.1: This version of Windows running with the processor or chipsets used in this system has limited support from Microsoft. For more information about Microsoft’s support, please see Microsoft’s Support Lifecycle FAQ at https://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle

Ultrabook, Celeron, Celeron Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon, Xeon Phi, Xeon Inside, and Intel Optane are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.

In-home warranty is available only on select customizable HP desktop PCs. Need for in-home service is determined by HP support representative. Customer may be required to run system self-test programs or correct reported faults by following advice given over phone. On-site services provided only if issue can't be corrected remotely. Service not available holidays and weekends.

HP will transfer your name and address information, IP address, products ordered and associated costs and other personal information related to processing your application to Bill Me Later®. Bill Me Later will use that data under its privacy policy.

Microsoft Windows 10: Not all features are available in all editions or versions of Windows 10. Systems may require upgraded and/or separately purchased hardware, drivers, software or BIOS update to take full advantage of Windows 10 functionality. Windows 10 is automatically updated, which is always enabled. ISP fees may apply and additional requirements may apply over time for updates. See http://www.microsoft.com.

“Best All In One Printer” and “the easiest printer you’ve ever had to set up” from Wirecutter. ©2020 The Wirecutter, Inc.. All rights reserved. Used under license. https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-all-in-one-printer/

Get Marvel’s Avengers when you purchase HP gaming PCs with qualifying 9th gen or 10th gen Intel® Core™ i5, i7 and i9 processors. Redemption code will be sent out by email within 60 days of purchase. Limited quantities and while supply lasts. Offer valid thru 12/31/2020 only while supplies last. We reserve the right to replace titles in the offer for ones of equal or greater value. Certain titles may not be available to all consumers because of age restrictions. The Offer may be changed, cancelled, or suspended at any time, for any reason, without notice, at Intel’s reasonable discretion if its fairness or integrity affected whether due to human or technical error. The Offer sponsor is Intel Corporation, 2200 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA. To participate you must create an Intel Digital Hub Account, purchase a qualifying product during the redemption period, enter a valid Master Key, and respond to a brief survey. Information you submit is collected, stored, processed, and used on servers in the USA. For more information on offer details, eligibility, restrictions, and our privacy policy, visit https://softwareoffer.intel.com/offer/20Q3-19/terms.

© 2020 MARVEL. © Intel Corporation. Intel, the Intel logo, and other Intel marks are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

The personal information you provide will be used according to the HP Privacy Statement (https://www8.hp.com/us/en/privacy/ww-privacy.html)