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ProCurve switch 2610 FAQs


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The FAQs listed below are for these products:

  • J9085A ProCurve Switch 2610-24
  • J9086A ProCurve Switch 2610-24/12PWR
  • J9087A ProCurve Switch 2610-24-PWR
  • J9088A ProCurve Switch 2610-48
  • J9089A ProCurve Switch 2610-48-PWR
»  View FAQs for a different group of products

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General
» Q: What is the ProCurve Switch 2610 Series?
» Q: What type of warranty is provided?
» Q: What is the benefit of updating the software on my ProCurve switch?
» Q: Where can I find the latest documentation for my switch?


Hardware
» Q: What is the maximum ambient operating temperature?
» Q: What is the maximum operating altitude?
» Q: Where is the management console port?
» Q: Are these switches quiet enough for an open office environment?
» Q: Why does the speed of the fans in my switch change?


Cabling and Connectivity
» Q: How does auto-negotiation work on my switch?
» Q: How does auto-negotiation work for fiber optic mini-GBICs?
» Q: Why can't I configure the 1000 Base-T ports for 1000 Full-Duplex operation?
» Q: What is HP Auto-MDIX and how does it work?
» Q: What type of twisted pair cables and lengths can I use with my switch?


Performance
» Q: What is the throughput of the switch?
» Q: What is the switching capacity?
» Q: How large is the MAC address table?


QoS
» Q: Is priority queuing supported?
» Q: How many QoS rules are supported?
» Q: How do I change the number of queues from two (default) to four?


Power and PoE (Power over Ethernet)
» Q: Which models support PoE?
» Q: Where can I find more information on how to implement PoE using my ProCurve Switches?
» Q: How much Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) wattage is available?
» Q: What power accessories are available?
» Q: What do the PoE, EPS, and RPS LEDs indicate?
» Q: If power is lost to the internal power supply and an RPS/EPS becomes active, when power returns does the switch revert back to the internal power supply?
» Q: What PoE devices have been tested and verified to work?
» Q: What pre-standard PoE devices are supported?
» Q: How does one enable pre-standard PoE support?
» Q: What PoE devices are NOT compatible?
» Q: What are the two device types defined for PoE implementations?
» Q: How does PSE (power sourcing equipment) know when a PD (powered device) needs POE?


Accessories
» Q: Which ProCurve mini-GBICs are supported?
» Q: What are the HP part numbers for the console cable and rack mount brackets?


Features
» Q: Are Jumbo frames supported?
» Q: Are Jumbo frames enabled per VLAN or per physical interface?
» Q: What type of spanning tree implementation is supported?
» Q: How would MSTP interact with switches that support only IEEE 802.1D STP or IEEE 802.1w RSTP?
» Q: What advantage does implementation of IEEE 802.1s MSTP offer over legacy STP or RSTP?
» Q: What are the default DSCP codepoint values?


Network and Switch Management
» Q: How can I manage my switch?
» Q: How do I update the software on my switch?
» Q: What versions of SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) are supported?
» Q: What port-mirroring options are available?
» Q: What is sFlow and how do I use it?


VLANs
» Q: Are IEEE 802.1v Protocol VLANs supported?
» Q: How many VLANs are supported?


Routing
» Q: Is routing supported?
» Q: With routing enabled, how can I prohibit a VLAN from routing traffic?
» Q: How many IP addresses are supported per interface (VLAN)?
» Q: Can I create a static route on a VLAN interface that gets its IP address from DHCP?
» Q: Does the switch use hardware or software routing?


Multicast
» Q: Is Data Driven IGMP supported?
» Q: Is IGMP Snooping supported?
» Q: What is the difference between Data Driven IGMP and IGMP snooping?
» Q: How many IGMP groups are supported?


Security
» Q: What combinations of 802.1X, Web-based authentication, and MAC-based authentication can be used concurrently on a switch port?
» Q: Are ACLs (Access-Control Lists) Supported?
» Q: What is Spanning-tree root-guard?

Answers

General

Q: What is the ProCurve Switch 2610 Series?

The ProCurve Switch 2610 Series consists of five switches—the 2610-24 and 2610-48 provide 24 and 48 ports of 10/100Base-TX connectivity. The 2610-24 has no fan, ensuring quiet operation and making it ideal for deployment in open spaces. The 2610-24/12PWR, 2610-24-PWR, and 2610-48-PWR are IEEE 802.3af-compliant for Power over Ethernet (PoE) and provide up to 15.4 W for 12, 24, and 48 ports. The 2610-24/12PWR has 24 10/100 ports and provides 12 ports of PoE. All switches include two 10/100/1000Base-T ports and two mini-GBIC slots for Gigabit uplink connectivity. An optional redundant external power supply also is available to provide redundancy in the event of a power supply failure. With static routing, robust security and management features, lifetime warranty, and free software updates, the 2610 series is a cost-effective solution for customers who are building converged enterprise edge networks.

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Q: What type of warranty is provided?

The ProCurve Switch 2610 Series features ProCurve Lifetime Warranty with next business-day advance replacement. Free phone support is also included for the life of the product. Please refer to the ProCurve Web site (http://www.procurve.com) for your local technical support number.

For as long as you own the product, with next-business-day advance replacement (available in most countries).  The following hardware products and their related family modules have a one-year warranty with extensions available: The ProCurve Routing Switch 9300m Series, ProCurve Switch 8100fl Series, ProCurve Access Control Server 745wl, and the ProCurve Network Access Controller 800. Standalone software may have a different warranty duration. For details, refer to the ProCurve Software License, Warranty, and Support booklet at: http://www.hp.com/rnd/support/warranty/index.htm

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Q: What is the benefit of updating the software on my ProCurve switch?

One of the benefits of owning a ProCurve product is free software updates. Maintaining current software ensures that you have the latest fixes and features. In addition to addressing occasional issues in new software versions, ProCurve Networking also adds features and enhancements to software which provide investment protection by extending the value and functional life of products. A proactive notification service is available on the My ProCurve portal (http://my.procurve.com). This service generates an e-mail alert when the product line you select has a new version of software posted to the ProCurve Web site.

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Q: Where can I find the latest documentation for my switch?

For the latest documentation please visit the ProCurve Web site at www.hp.com/rnd/support/manuals/2610.htm.

Hardware

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Q: What is the maximum ambient operating temperature?

The maximum ambient operating temperature is 50 degrees Celsius or 122 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Q: What is the maximum operating altitude?

10,000 feet or approximately 3 kilometers.

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Q: Where is the management console port?

The management console port is conveniently located at the bottom left corner of the front-panel. The switch uses an RJ-45 connector for the console cable (5188-3836).

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Q: Are these switches quiet enough for an open office environment?

The Switch 2610-24 is completely fan-less, making it ideal for an open office environment. The variable speed fan in the Switch 2610-48, and Switch 2610-24/12PWR provides quiet operation when they are used in an open office environment or conference room and the fan is operating at low speed. While the Switch 2610-24-PWR and 2610-48-PWR also use a two-speed fan, they are intended for use in a wiring closet or server rack. They may be used in an open office environment if noise is not a concern.

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Q: Why does the speed of the fans in my switch change?

The switch has two-speed fans whose speed increases when the ambient temperature is approximately 30 degrees Celsius. This is due to the increased airflow requirements as the ambient temperature increases.

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Cabling and Connectivity

Q: How does auto-negotiation work on my switch?

By default all RJ-45 ports are set to auto-negotiate. That is, when connecting a device to a port the switch will operate in one of two ways to determine the link speed and the communication mode (half duplex or full duplex):

If the device you are connecting also is configured to Auto, the switch will automatically negotiate both link speed and communication mode
If the device you are connecting has a fixed configuration, for example 100 Mbps, at half or full duplex, the switch will automatically sense the link speed, but will default to a communication mode of half duplex.

The switch complies with the IEEE 802.3u standard. If a device connected to the RJ-45 port of the switch has a fixed configuration at full duplex, the device will not connect correctly to the switch. The result will be high error rates and very inefficient communications between the switch and the device.

To ensure correct operation it is recommended to set all ports on the switch and all devices you are connecting to auto-negotiate. If a device requires a fixed configuration, make sure to set the appropriate mode on the switch port.

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Q: How does auto-negotiation work for fiber optic mini-GBICs?

Per the IEEE 802.3z specification, if one side of a connection is configured to auto-negotiate, the other side also must be set to auto-negotiate if the connection is to come up. In other words, if a switch is port is configured to auto-negotiate and its attached end node is configured for 1000 Mbps/full-duplex, the 803.2z spec requires that the switch NOT allow the link to come up.

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Q: Why can't I configure the 1000 Base-T ports for 1000 Full-Duplex operation?

The full-duplex setting is not required by the IEEE 802.3ab 1000 Base-T standard. In order to be compliant with the standard, devices must be able to auto-negotiate to 1000 full-duplex when the port is configured to "auto". If your device does not operate at 1000 full-duplex with the switch port set to "auto", check your device driver and cable, or contact technical support for your product(s).

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Q: What is HP Auto-MDIX and how does it work?

The switch automatically detects the signaling on the cable from the connected device and operates as either an MDI or an MDIX port. As a result, a straight-through twisted-pair cable can be used; you no longer have to use crossover cables, although crossover cables can also be used for any of the connections.

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Q: What type of twisted pair cables and lengths can I use with my switch?

For ports operating at 10 Mbps, the maximum length is 100 meters using category 3, 4, or 5, 100 ohm differential unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or shielded twisted-pair (STP) cable.

For ports operating at 100 Mbps, the maximum length is 100 meters using category 5, 100 ohm differential UTP or STP cable.

For ports operating at 1000 Mbps, the maximum length is 100 meters using category 5E or better, 100 ohm differential UTP or STP cable.

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Performance

Q: What is the throughput of the switch?

The 24 port models achieve 9.5 million PPS (packets per second) performance, and the 48 port models achieve 13.0 million PPS.

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Q: What is the switching capacity?

The switch features wire speed switching capacity at 12.8Gbps for 24 port models and 17.6Gbps for 48 port models

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Q: How large is the MAC address table?

Up to 8,000 MAC addresses can be stored by the switch.

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QoS

Q: Is priority queuing supported?

Yes, the switch supports the IEEE 802.1p standard for tagging traffic to four (4) Weighted Round-Robin queues for traffic prioritization. Note: two (2) queues are enabled by default; you must run the qos-passthrough-mode typical command, save the configuration and then reboot to enable four queues.

The Weighted Round-Robin algorithm uses weights of 64, 16, 4, and 1 for the four queues from the highest to the lowest queue. This provides for about 75% of all Hi-priority traffic to be forwarded when a system is fully loaded. Weighted Round-Robin algorithms are useful so that Low-priority traffic queues are not 'starved' when the Hi-priority queue constantly has pending traffic.

Since 802.1p specifies 8 priority levels, implementations with less than 8 forwarding queues (in this case of 4 queues) map the tagged traffic in the following manner:

802.1p priority value used in Tagged VLAN packets

Mapped to Outbound Queue

Round Robin Weighting

1 (Low)

1

1 (Low)

2 (Low)

1

1 (Low)

0 (Normal or unspecified)

2

4 (Normal)

3

2

4 (Normal)

4

3

16 (High)

5

3

16 (High)

6

4

64 (Highest)

7 (High Priority)

4

64 (Highest)

Per-Port prioritization can be set using the following command:

interface <port number> qos priority <0 .. 7>

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Q: How many QoS rules are supported?

Up to 120 hardware QoS rules are supported. Of those, 30 can be TCP/UDP port rules. Typically each CLI rule uses 2 hardware rules.

Traffic can be prioritized and reprioritized using the following criteria:

  1. TCP/UDP port number
  2. Source/Destination IP address
  3. Type-of-Service IP Precedence Bits
  4. Type-of-Service IP Differentiated Services (diffserv)
  5. VLAN ID
  6. Source port
  7. Incoming 802.1p priority

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Q: How do I change the number of queues from two (default) to four?

The qos-passthrough-mode <typical | optimized> command is used to change the queue configuration. By default, the passthrough mode is set to optimized (two queues), but it can be changed to support four queues by changing the mode to typical. The configuration of the switch must be saved and the switch rebooted in order for the change to take effect.

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Power and PoE (Power over Ethernet)

Q: Which models support PoE?

The Switch 2610-24/12PWR, Switch 2610-24-PWR, and the Switch 2610-48-PWR support PoE.

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Q: Where can I find the latest documentation for my switch?

Please refer to the PoE Planning and Implementation Guide available at www.hp.com/rnd/support/manuals/2610.htm.

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Q: How much Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) wattage is available?

The 2610-24-PWR and 2610-48-PWR both have an internal power supply that can provide up to 406 watts of power to PoE devices.

For the 2610-24-PWR, that’s enough to supply 15.4 watts per port for all 24 10/100 ports, which is the maximum allowed by the 802.3af specification for Power Sourcing Equipment.

For the 2610-48-PWR, 406 watts is enough for 24 ports at the maximum allowable wattage, or all 48 ports at an average of 8.4 Watts (most IP phones do not require more than this)

For the 2610-24/12PWR, there is 126 Watts, enough for 8 PoE ports at the full 15.4 Watts per port, or 12 ports at an average of 10.5 watts per port.

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Q: What power accessories are available?

ProCurve 600 Redundant External Power Supply (J8168A)
ProCurve 610 External Power Supply (J8169A)

The ProCurve 600 Redundant External Power Supply can be used to provide redundancy and extra power for PoE devices. The RPS 600 can be connected to as many as 6 switches to provide redundant power for the internal power supply (Note: Only one switch can draw redundant power at a time). In addition the RPS 600 features 2 EPS ports to provide additional PoE power to devices. A single EPS port can deliver an additional 408W of power, and if both are used, each can deliver an additional 204W.

The ProCurve 610 External Power Supply can be used to provide extra power for PoE devices and, when used in conjunction with the RPS 600, can be part of a redundant solution. It provides four EPS ports to provide additional PoE power to devices. The four EPS ports are consist of two pairs. Each pair can provide 408W of power, thus each port can provide either 408W or 204W of power depending on if a single port in a pair is being utilized or if power is being shared across both ports in a pair.

Below is a table that shows some examples of various power options:

2610-24/12PWR

Power Configuration

Total PoE Power

Example Usage

Achievable Redundancy

Internal Power Supply (IPS) Only

126W

8 @ 15.4W or 12 @ 7.0W

N/A

IPS + RPS

126W

8 @ 15.4W or 12 @ 7.0W

Switch Power Only

IPS + RPS + EPS

534W

12 @ 15.4W

8 @ 15.4W or 12 @ 7.0W

IPS + RPS + shared EPS

330W

12 @15.4W

8 @ 15.4W or 12 @ 7.0W

2610-24-PWR

Power Configuration

Total PoE Power

Example Usage

Achievable Redundancy

Internal Power Supply (IPS) Only

406W

24 @ 15.4W

N/A

IPS + RPS

406W

24 @ 15.4W

Switch Power Only

IPS + RPS + EPS

814W

24 @ 15.4W

24 @ 15.4W

IPS + RPS + shared EPS

610W

24 @ 15.4W

24 @ 7.0W

2610-48-PWR

Power Configuration

Total PoE Power

Example Usage

Achievable Redundancy

Internal Power Supply (IPS) Only

406W

48 @ 7.0W or 24 @ 15.4W

N/A

IPS + RPS

406W

48 @ 7.0W or 24 @ 15.4W

Switch Power Only

IPS + RPS + EPS

1-24 = 406W
25-48 = 408W

48 @ 15.4W

48 @ 7.0W or 24 @ 15.4W

IPS + RPS + shared EPS

1-24 = 406W
24-48 = 204W

1-24 @ 15.4W, 25-48 @ 7.0W

48 @ 4W or 24 @ 7.0W or 12 @ 15.4W

Note: Configurations may vary, the above are strictly examples.

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Q: What do the PoE, EPS, and RPS LEDs indicate?

LED

Status

Meaning

PoE

On

Normal operation. The switch is ready to supply PoE power.

Flashing orange every 1.6 seconds

One or more ports has experienced a fault condition for PoE delivery. The Fault LED also will be flashing.

Flashing orange every 0.8 seconds

One or more ports has an alert condition for PoE delivery.

EPS

On

Normal operation. Switch is connected to an EPS and is receiving power.

Off

Switch is not connected to an EPS or a connected EPS is not powered up.

Flashing orange

The EPS has experienced a fault, indicating that PoE is oversubscribed, that the EPS itself has experienced a fault, or that the switch and the EPS cannot communicate. Review the switch’s event log for more details.

RPS

On

Normal operation. Switch is connected to an RPS and is receiving power.

Off

Switch is not connected to an RPS.

Flashing orange

Switch is connected to an RPS, but it may be powering another switch or experiencing a fault.

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Q: If power is lost to the internal power supply and an RPS/EPS becomes active, when power returns does the switch revert back to the internal power supply?

Yes. The switch automatically uses the internal power supply if power becomes available again, making the RPS/EPS available to other devices that may be using it for redundancy.

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Q: What PoE devices have been tested and verified to work?

Typically, any device that is IEEE 802.3af compliant will work.

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Q: What pre-standard PoE devices are supported?

Cisco 7902G, 7905G, 7912G, 7940G, 7960G IP Phones

Cisco Aironet 350, 1100, 1200, 1230AG Access Points

Cisco pre-802.3af standard phones require the use of a cross-over cable from this switch to their device. These devices are dependent on the polarity of the DC voltage (a violation of the 802.3af standard).

Mitel 5220 (non-dual mode) IP Phone

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Q: How does one enable pre-standard PoE support?

By default, pre-standard detection is disabled. To enable pre-standard detection you must run the power pre-std-detect command. Some devices also may require the use of a crossover cable to receive power.

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Q: What PoE devices are NOT compatible?

Not all PoE devices are necessarily IEEE 802.3af compliant. Early versions of IP Phones, though they may accept power over the Ethernet cable using their own Mid-Span Power devices, may only accept power over the Non-Data Pairs of wires (Category 5 cable, pins 4/5 and 7/8). The 802.3af specification clearly states that Power Devices MUST accept power over either Data Pairs (1/2 and 3/6) or the non-data pairs. Furthermore, a compliant device must also be 'insensitive' to polarity, meaning that it should power up to either +50VDC or -50VDC.

The 2610 series PWR switches provide PoE power over the Data Pairs with pair 1/2 being Positive DC.

Generally speaking, devices that cannot or do not claim 802.3af compliancy may not work with the 2610 Series PWR switches. NOTE: Some pre-standard devices may work with your switch. See “What pre-standard devices are supported?” (above).

Products that do not work:

Siemens OptiPoint 400 version 3.0 - This phone only accept power on pairs 4/5 and 7/8 and will not power up.

Avaya 1st generation IP phones - 4606, 4612 and 4624 Gen 1 phones Pre-802.3af standard phones. Not powered over Data Pairs. Identified via the Model Code # of the form: 46xx01A-xxx where 'x' is a model specific number, for example, 462401A-003.

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Q: What are the two device types defined for PoE implementations?

The first type, called the powered device or PD, receives power from the second type, called the power sourcing equipment or PSE. The ProCurve Switch 2610 acts as the PSE. Powered devices (PD) include any Ethernet device capable of receiving power through a data port such as IP telephones, IP cameras, PDAs and tablet PCs. Power sourcing equipment, such as ProCurve switches with PoE support, must meet IEEE 802.3af specifications for voltage (47 to 57 volts DC) and wattage (up to 15.4 watts), with further limitations on devices that receive power. The ProCurve Switch 2610 is PoE-enabled to support both IEEE 802.3af compliant devices, as well as some pre-802.3af standard devices.

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Q: How does PSE (power sourcing equipment) know when a PD (powered device) needs POE?

In most networks, PSE will be connected to some devices that support PoE and some that do not. Consequently, in order to prevent damage to non-PoE devices, the 802.3af specification includes a negotiation mechanism between PSEs and the stations connected to them. Under the specification, PSEs apply a slight voltage on the power-delivery pairs. If there is a valid PD on the cable, it will present a specific resistance and a capacitance. Typically, this discovery process requires approximately 500 milliseconds. The PSE will apply the full wattage if it discovers a PD, but the flow is current-limited to prevent damage to the cable and equipment under fault conditions.

After discovery, a PD must draw a minimum current for the power flow to remain active. If, for example, the PD is unplugged; the PSE will discontinue power supply over the cable. The discovery process will be repeated when the PD is returned to service.

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Accessories

Q: Which ProCurve mini-GBICs are supported?

Please refer to the ProCurve mini-GBIC FAQ for the latest information: http://www.hp.com/rnd/support/faqs/mini-GBICs.htm

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Q: What are the HP part numbers for the console cable and rack mount brackets?

Console Cable RJ-45
All models : 5188-3836 or 5188-6699

Rack Mount Brackets
Switch 2610-24, Switch 2610-48, and Switch 2610-24/12PWR: 5069-6535
Switch 2610-24-PWR and Switch 2610-48-PWR: 5069-5705

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Features

Q: Are Jumbo frames supported?

Yes. The switch can accept and forward packets up to 9,216 bytes in size when configured for jumbo traffic. By default, the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) is 1,522 bytes. The switch drops any inbound packets larger than the MTU allowed on a port.

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Q: Are Jumbo frames enabled per VLAN or per physical interface?

Inbound jumbo packets are enabled on a per-VLAN basis. That is, on a VLAN configured for jumbo traffic, all ports belonging to that VLAN will accept and forward packets up to 9,216 bytes in size.

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Q: What type of spanning tree implementation is supported?

IEEE 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol.

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Q: How would MSTP interact with switches that support only IEEE 802.1D STP or IEEE 802.1w RSTP?

MSTP is backward-compatible with the RSTP-enabled and STP-enabled switches in your network. Use the following command to optimize this interoperability:

ProCurveSwitch2610 (config)# spanning-tree force-version < stp-compatible | rstp-operation | mstp-operation>

STP-Enabled Switch Compatibility

The protocol operates as STP on all ports.

RSTP-Enabled Switch Compatibility

The protocol operates as Rapid STP on all ports except those ports where a system that is using 802.1d Spanning Tree has been detected.

MSTP Operation

The protocol operates as Multiple STP on all ports where compatibility to the old STP protocol versions is not required.

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Q: What advantage does implementation of IEEE 802.1s MSTP offer over legacy STP or RSTP?

The 802.1D and 802.1w spanning tree protocols operate without regard to a network's VLAN configuration, and maintain one common spanning tree throughout a bridged network. Thus, these protocols map one loop-free, logical topology on a given physical topology. This causes redundant links to be blocked; they are then available on a standby basis. With MSTP, each spanning tree instance can include one or more VLANs and applies a separate, per-instance forwarding topology. Thus, when a port belongs to multiple VLANs, it may be dynamically blocked in one spanning tree instance, but forwarding in another instance. This achieves load-balancing across the network while still providing fault tolerance through rapid, automatic reconfiguration if there is a failure in a network's physical topology.

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Q: What are the default DSCP codepoint values?

The DSCP Policy Table associates an 802.1p priority with a specific ToS byte codepoint in an IPv4 packet. This enables you to set a traffic management policy that operates independently of 802.1Q VLAN-tagging. In the default state, most of the 64 codepoints do not assign an 802.1p priority, as indicated by "No-override" value in the table below.

You can use the show qos dscp-map command to list the current DSCP Policy table. Use the qos dscp-map command to change the codepoint priority assignments, and assign optional names to the codepoints.

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Network and Switch Management

Q: How can I manage my switch?

The switch offers two management interfaces. A command line interface is accessible via the console port, Telnet, or SSH. The CLI offers two commands, setup and menu, to help simplify common configuration tasks and view information.

There also is a convenient and easy to use Web browser interface that can be used to manage many of the switch’s features. To access the Web browser interface you must first determine the IP address of the switch interface you are connected to. To determine the IP address from the CLI you can run the show ip command. The Web browser interface requires a browser that supports Java. Internet Explorer is the recommended browser.

Q: How do I update the software on my switch?

Please see the latest Release Notes for your product for detailed instructions.

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Q: What versions of SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) are supported?

Version 1, version 2c, and version 3 are supported.

Please note SNMP options must be configured from the CLI. SNMP must be enabled for communication with ProCurve Manager and other network management applications.

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Q: What port-mirroring options are available?

One instance of port mirroring of ingress and egress traffic is supported. Any port/trunk can be mirrored to another port on the same switch.

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Q: What is sFlow and how do I use it?

sFlow is a technology for monitoring traffic in data networks containing switches and routers.  In particular, it defines the sampling mechanisms implemented in an sFlow Agent for monitoring traffic, the sFlow MIB for controlling the sFlow Agent, and the format of sample data used by the sFlow Agent when forwarding data to a central data collector.

One instance of sFlow is supported which can be configured using SNMP or ProCurve Manager.

If you are using ProCurve Manager Plus (PCM+) for traffic monitoring on your switches, no further configuration is needed. sFlow monitoring requires the use of a management software application such as ProCurve Manager Plus 2.0 which receives, collects, and displays the traffic data. The process of configuring the management application for data collection involves sending snmp set commands that trigger the switch to send the sFlow data.

To allow the management station to configure the sFlow parameters, the software needs to be configured with valid read and write SNMP community names or valid SNMPv3 configuration information that matches what is configured on the switch.

The show sflow command set may be used to view various aspects of the sFlow configuration and status.

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VLANs

Q: Are IEEE 802.1v Protocol VLANs supported?

Yes. Protocol VLANs allow you to isolate particular protocols to a VLAN. The following protocols can be isolated:

ipx IPX Protocol Group
ipv4 IP version 4 Protocol Group
ipv6 P version 6 Protocol Group
arp Address Resolution Protocol Group
appletalk Appletalk Protocol Group
sna System Network Architecture Protocol Group
decnet Digital Equipment Corporation Network Protocol Group
netbeui Network BIOS Enhanced User Interface Protocol Group

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Q: How many VLANs are supported?

Up to 256 VLANs are supported. To enable more than 8 VLANs you must use the
max-vlans <1-256> command to set the upper limit, save the configuration using the write mem command, and reboot the switch using the reload command.

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Routing

Q: Is routing supported?

Up to 16 static routes can be configured. The switch can also route traffic between its connected interfaces. To enable routing, use the ip routing command.

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Q: With routing enabled, how can I prohibit a VLAN from routing traffic?

With routing enabled, any VLAN that has an IP address configured is a routed VLAN. If you do not wish to have traffic routed on a particular VLAN, do not configure an IP address on that VLAN.

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Q: How many IP addresses are supported per interface (VLAN)?

Each VLAN can be assigned a maximum of eight IP addresses.

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Q: Can I create a static route on a VLAN interface that gets its IP address from DHCP?

No. The user is prohibited from changing an interface to DHCP if a static route is using that interface. Conversely, the user is prohibited from adding a static route to an interface that has a DHCP IP address.

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Q: Does the switch use hardware or software routing?

The switch can have up to 228 host-routes in hardware without a performance impact. If the number of host-routes exceeds that, software routing is used which may impact performance. The maximum host routing table size is 10,000.

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Multicast

Q: Is Data Driven IGMP supported?

Yes.

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Q: Is IGMP Snooping supported?

Yes.

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Q: What is the difference between Data Driven IGMP and IGMP snooping?

A switch that uses data-driven IGMP filters multicast traffic until it learns where the receivers are; regular IGMP snooping causes the switch to flood until it learns the locations of receivers.

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Q: How many IGMP groups are supported?

Up to 256 IGMP groups are supported.

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Security

Q: What combinations of 802.1X, Web-based authentication, and MAC-based authentication can be used concurrently on a switch port?

Supported:
  • 802.1X Authentication only
  • MAC Authentication only
  • Web Authentication only
  • Concurrent 802.1X and MAC Authentication
  • Concurrent 802.1X and Web Authentication
Not supported:
  • Concurrent MAC and Web Authentication
  • Concurrent 802.1X and MAC and Web Authentication

Note: 802.1X Authentication supports up to eight sessions per port.

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Q: Are ACLs (Access-Control Lists) Supported?

Yes, two types of ACLs are supported with a maximum of 127 for each type (total of 254):

  1. Port Based ACLs
    Port Based ACLs can be configured through the CLI (Command Line Interface)
    ACLs can be shared across ports
    ACLs can filter Layer 3 IP, and Layer 4 source and destination TCP/UDP ports
    Logging can be configured for deny, first hit, and summary every 5 minutes
  2. User Based ACLs
    Must be configured through IDM (Identity Driven Manager)
    Supports a maximum of two users per port
    Processes Layer 2 MAC, Layer 3 IP, and Layer 4  TCP/UDP
    Counters are available and can be displayed using the  show access-list radius <Port> command.

 

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Q: What is Spanning-tree root-guard?

When a port is enabled as root-guard, it cannot be selected as the root port even if it receives superior STP BPDUs. The port is assigned an “alternate” port role and enters a blocking state if it receives superior STP BPDUs. See the chapter titled “Multiple Instance Spanning Tree Operation” in the Advanced Traffic Management Guide for your switch.

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